How Much Does Trekking to Everest Base Camp Cost?

By |Tags: , , , , , , |

By Telma and Thomas | 18 October 2016 | Nepal | Budget

People often have the idea that trekking to Everest Base Camp is only for the wealthy. But it’s not. It’s affordable to most of us. In fact, we met people on the trail doing it on a shoestring: walking all the way to avoid the expensive flight to Lukla, cooking their own meals and camping. That only shows that anyone can go.
Although we were not on a super-strict budget we still ended up running out money due to bad budgeting. We found that many resources online didn’t quite show how much money people really need. Often it talked about the flights, documentation and the cost of a room at a teahouse, but what about Insurance, Trekking Gear, Renting Gear, Food and all the other extras? Our list, is the ultimate breakdown on how much an Everest Base Camp trek costs.

The first question that came to our heads during the planning stage was: How can we trek to Everest Base Camp without breaking the bank? And it wasn’t until digging deeper on Google that we found out that we could trek independently, which is a massive saving on the budget. Unfortunately, people are not aware of it because as soon as you type on google “Everest Base Camp”, the first page it’s only for Tours and it isn’t until you type “Everest Base Camp travel blog”, that you find out that many fellow bloggers have done it.
Saying that, we found bias opinions about tours or going independently because a few bloggers do get paid or invited to join a tour and later promote the company on their blogs. However, we also found people who did it independently and enjoyed it as much.

Trekking to Everest Base Camp independently and on a budget is possible. We can show you how!

Note: The prices shown below are for two people for the length of 16 nights/17 days.

Everest Base Camp Costs?

Flights
Unless people want to add an extra 4-5 days by walking to/from Jiri, flying is the only option. Although quicker it’s not cheap at all. At a whopping USD170 per person for a 30 minutes’ flight it will have you wondering if walking could be a better option.
Having done it, I would say: splurge a little. The views from the Himalayas are incredible and if like us your flight is smooth and the weather is just perfect, that will be without doubt a flight to remember!
Cost: Rs71,500/USD$655/GBP£515

Insurance
It sucks! But must be done. We never travel without insurance and no-one should. Unfortunately, our policy did not include trekking at high altitude, so we had to buy a new one just for the length of our stay. Insurance for 17 days: Level 3 – Trekking up to 6,000 meters on recognised routes (UK Citizens or Residents only).
Cost: Rs23,500/USD$215/GBP£170

Documents
No-one can go trekking in Nepal without obtaining documentation. Not only that is a safe tracking system to know people’s whereabouts, because accidents do happen, but also the fees goes towards the maintenance of Sagarmatha National Park.
Both documents are compulsory.
TIMS (Trekkers’ Information Management System) Rs2000 per person
National Park Permit Rs3,390 per person
Cost for two people: Rs10,780/USD$95/GBP£75

Trekking Clothing & Gear
Unfortunately, we had to buy majority of our trekking gear, because it’s not something that we carry during our travels. We had been travelling for nearly a year and had been lucky to have visited countries during the Spring or Summer.
So, when deciding to go trekking to Everest Base Camp, we knew there wasn’t much option but buying the minimum. For more about our packing list check here.

Trekking Clothing
Cost: Rs14,000/USD$130/GBP£100

Renting Gear
Sleeping Bag – Rs80 per day
Down Jacket – Rs60 per day
Cost for two people: 17 days = Rs4,750/USD$40/GBP£35

Miscellaneous
Not wanting to buy a lot because ultimately, we were the ones carrying it, we managed to buy the essentials. Our original First Aid Kit needed some refilling so maybe that is why in this section some people will not spend as much.
First Aid Kit / Toiletries
Snacks
Prayer Flags (pack of five)
Cost for two people: Rs3000/USD$30/GBP£25

Accommodation & Food
Paying for a room on the trail is actually laughable at how cheap it is. The “most expensive” room at Gorap Shep was Rs300, other villages rooms were at Rs100 or in some teahouses, free of charge if we had all our meals there. Regarding food, it really depends on how the body reacts at high altitude and after walking for several hours a day. After Tengoche, from day 5, we both developed an enormous appetite and were very hungry all the time. Nevertheless to say that the meals are not that big and seeing people eating porridge for breakfast and soup for dinner, made us even more hungry. We ate a lot and skimping on food along the trail was never an option.
Average food prices are between Rs300-Rs700 for a meal. Also the higher you are, the price of the food increases. Food isn’t that expensive, it’s true but when eating 4-5 times a day it adds up.
Cost: Rs80,900/USD$740/GBP£580 (includes 4-5 meals a day each, dozens of tea pots and deserts)

Wifi & Charging electronics
Having a power bank helped a lot, there was no need to pay for charging our electronics. Only at Namche we charged the phone and GoPro, but it was “free of charge” because we ate there.
We also had purchased a SIM card prior to Everest Base Camp but at Lobuche when there was no signal, we bought a Data card.
Average charging rates: Rs250-Rs350
Rs500 – 200MB data
Rs250 – charging power bank for 1 hour
Cost: Rs750/USD$7.50/GBP£5

Airport Transport
Perhaps there is a bus to/from Kathmandu to the airport but on the 1st day, our flight was at 7am and the check in at 6am, getting a taxi seemed obvious.
On the way back, we met this lovely couple at Lukla, and once in Kathmandu we shared a taxi to Thamel.
Cost: Rs800/USD$7/GBP£5 (Drop off & Pick up)

Grand Total: Rs209,980 / £1,530 for two people

Summary:
Because we ate so much and often, the amount of money spent on food is probably the equivalent of having hired a Guide/Porter. Some people will argue this budget is way too much, some might say it’s not enough. As usual, we can’t win.
The truth is, nothing can really prepare you for this trek: some people reach base camp on day 8, some only eat two meals a day, others cook their own meals and camp all the way. Everyone is different. We took our time, added days when necessary, ate a lot and enjoyed every moment of it. Thinking about it, there isn’t much we would have changed, apart maybe adding a “little porter”.
We are very happy with the budget and at £765/USD950 per person, considering that a third is just for the flights, trekking to Everest Base Camp can be achieved.

What do you think of our budget?

breakdown of costs for everest base camp

Pin this image to your Pinterest Board.

Thank-You for Readingfiji islands travel blog

We are Thomas and Telma – the writers, photographers, videographers and founders of Blank Canvas Voyage.

Let us inspire you to explore the world through the sharing of our experiences, stories, videos and useful tips. Click here to know more about our journey.

Packing List – What to Pack for Everest Base Camp

By |Tags: , , , , , , , , |

By Telma and Thomas | 20 October 2016 | Nepal | Travel Advice

The clothing required will depend on when you go to Everest Base Camp. During the warmer months, a down jacket might not be a necessity but when trekking in the winter, when temperatures drop below zero from sunset to sunrise, bringing one is definitely a must.
The same goes for hiring a sleeping bag. Teahouses will provide blankets but it might not be enough for the freezing nights. Having trekked in November and having brought a -20 sleeping bag for below zero temperatures at high altitude was without doubt, worth it!
It’s always best to have your own equipment since you will be familiar with it and know what works for you or not. But if like us you are travelling for long term, the only option is to buy clothes and gear in Kathmandu. Not wanting to splurge, the minimum to keep you warm from the cold weather is essential. Apart from ensuring we had adequate clothing, another important consideration was to keep our feet comfortable and dry. A trekker’s nightmare is to have blistered feet and we were lucky with our trekking boots. We bought them one month before the trek, and made sure they were well broken in before heading to Everest Base Camp.

Now, talking about our Packing List for Everest Base Camp: Did we need every single item on the list? No. And it wasn’t until the night before that we realised that perhaps we had selected way too much. But, I think we did well to be honest. Comparing to some lists online, we couldn’t figure out why on earth people were choosing to carry so much! And because ultimately we were the ones that would be carrying it, we tried to keep everything to a minimum. We managed 10 kilos/22 pounds each. Not ideal, but reasonably good. The heaviest items we just couldn’t leave behind were the sleeping bag, that weighed 2 kg/4 pounds and the down jacket 1 kg/2.2 pounds.
Some stuff was left at Namche and collected on the way down and a few items didn’t even make it to Lukla!

Below is everything we packed for trekking to Everest Base Camp.

Everest Base Camp Packing List

Trekking

  1. Sleeping Bag
  2. Sleeping Bag Liner
  3. Quick dry towels
  4. Leggings/Long Johns
  5. Long Sleeve
  6. Thick Wool Socks / Socks
  7. Rubber Slip-on Sandals
  8. Eye mask/ ear plugs

*1 – Hired from Ama Dablum Trek Shop. Insulated sleeping for freezing temperatures (up to -20)
*6 – Bought from Ama Dablum Trek Shop
*7 – Borrowed it from the Hotel

Note: Never used the towels. Left it at Namche and got it on the way back down.

everest base camp trekking list

Teahouse

  1. Sleeping Bag
  2. Sleeping Bag Liner
  3. Quick dry towels
  4. Leggings/Long Johns
  5. Long Sleeve
  6. Thick Wool Socks / Socks
  7. Rubber Slip-on Sandals
  8. Eye mask/ ear plugs

*1 – Hired from Ama Dablum Trek Shop. Insulated sleeping for freezing temperatures (up to -20)
*6 – Bought from Ama Dablum Trek Shop
*7 – Borrowed it from the Hotel

Note: Never used the towels. Left it at Namche and got it on the way back down.

complete everest base camp list

Gear & Miscellaneous

  1. Backpack
  2. Packing Cubes
  3. Poncho
  4. Single-Gated Carabiner
  5. Duct Tape
  6. Safety Pins/ Needles & Thread
  7. Pocket Knife
  8. Prayer Flags (pack of 5)
  9. British & Portuguese flags
  10. Headlamp
  11. Bin bags
  12. Picnic set
  13. Umbrella
  14. Map
  15. Compass
  16. Bottles

*16 – Never used and replaced with our water filtered bottles

Note: 3/6/12/13/15 – Left it in Kathmandu

things needed for everest base camp

Toiletries & First Aid Kit

  1. Toilet paper / Wet wipes
  2. Water purifying tablets
  3. Plasters
  4. Diamox
  5. Ibuprofen / Diarrhea & Constipation Tablets / Flu Tablets
  6. Face Mask
  7. Rehydration Salts
  8. Wound Cleansing Wipes
  9. Throat lozenges
  10. Sunscreen
  11. Deodorant
  12. Cotton Buds
  13. Tooth Paste/Brush/ Dental floss
  14. Gel Sanitiser
  15. Carmex/SPF Lip Balm
  16. Menstrual Cup/ Female urinating device
  17. Inhaler
  18. Bepanthen
  19. Baby Powder
  20. Nail Clippers/Filer
  21. Pocket Mirror/Tweezers
  22. Elastic bands/ Hair Clips

Note: 2/7/8/16/19/ – Left it at Namche and collect it on the way back down

everest base camp packing guide

Electronics

  1. Chest Strap Mount
  2. Flexible Octopus Tripod
  3. Selfie Pod
  4. Lumix Panasonic Charger x2 batteries
  5. Go Pro Battery Charger x2 batteries
  6. World Adapter Plug
  7. SD Card x2
  8. Power Bank
  9. GoPro & Waterproof case
  10. Iphone 5
  11. Camera Case
  12. Lumix Panasonic
  13. Iphone USB charger

Note: 1/3 – Left it in Kathmandu

equipment and gear for everest base camp

Food

  1. Digestive Biscuits
  2. Oreo Biscuits
  3. Snickers
  4. Peanuts
  5. Sweets

list of food for everest base camp

Where can you hire the best down jacket and sleeping bag in Kathmandu?

During our stay in Nepal we met several people and were lucky to have been introduced to a Sherpa family, who have a trekking shop. The owner trekked to Everest Base Camp hundreds of times as a Guide and has been as far as Camp 4. The last camp side before the Summit of Mount Everest. The shop is called Ama Dablum Trek Shop, located in Jyatha (North side of Thamel, next to Hotel White Rose). They might not have the variety of clothes and colours found in Thamel, but the quality is superb, the prices are reasonable and that is why we are recommending them.

What do you think of our packing list?

trekking gear for everest base camp

Pin this image to your Pinterest Board.

Thank-You for Readingfiji islands travel blog

We are Thomas and Telma – the writers, photographers, videographers and founders of Blank Canvas Voyage.

Let us inspire you to explore the world through the sharing of our experiences, stories, videos and useful tips. Click here to know more about our journey.