adventure is an undertaking usually involving danger and unknown risks

Camel Safari in Jaisalmer

By Telma | 22 April 2017 | India | Adventure Travel 

While travelling in India, we knew we wanted to go on a Camel Safari Jaisalmer. Always up for adventure, we wondered what it would be like to ride a camel and spend the night in the desert. Overwhelmed with the offer, it wasn’t an easy decision. We knew we didn’t want to join a big tour group, having a camel each was pretty much an agreement and the welfare of the animals was our main concern.

In the end, we decided to go on a private tour so we would have the camels for ourselves and get to know our guide a little bit more. The people from the desert fascinate me, they seem so mysterious and always have endless tales to tell.
In the end, we were very happy with our guide, we got a recommendation from the guests that were staying at the same hostel. But not all tours are great and fantastic experiences, I think we were genuinely very lucky with our camel safari. The day after our return we met two girls who hated theirs because it wasn’t what they had imagined. They had to share the guide with another 8 people, there wasn’t as many breaks as they wished they had (riding a camel is sooo painful!), the food wasn’t great and everyone slept inside tents. Now, that to me isn’t an adventure. It’s simply riding a camel to the desert. But each to their own.

Although our experience was incredible, the start of our day wasn’t as great. I guess having travelled for over a year and always being very careful with scams and touts, which we did pretty well considering some circumstances, we ended up being persuaded to join a sightseeing tour before the safari; all “part of the package”. Yes, it was a mistake. But as we as were making a video we thought it would look great to add some more footage about Jaisalmer. Unfortunately, it was terrible and it was not worth it at all. So I would not recommend adding any sightseeing to a Camel Safari Jaisalmer.

a camel safari in india



Camel Safari Jaisalmer

Sightseeing Tour

At first we were really excited about the sightseeing tour. Adding more footage to our video of the famous sites in Jaisalmer seemed perfect. What we didn’t know is that our Guide spoke broken English, would spent half the time on the phone and whatever question asked, he would reply “Oh, yes, it’s a very old fort/temple/village”. I mean…really?! Obviously we weren’t happy at all. Maybe some people are happy to be driven around and that’s it. But we like to know the history, the secrets, the tales. We were in Rajasthan!! Surely there must be some story tales about princes, and princesses, forts, tombs, conquests, battles and invasions…. Nope! Our “guide” didn’t have anything to say.

Disappointed to the point we cut the “tour” short and asked to be taken to meet the camel safari guide. Obviously at this stage we both did not look happy at all. Beautiful sites and we left knowing as much as we knew before the tour, nothing! What a waste of a morning!

The Sightseeing Tour and Camel Safari had been organised by the Guesthouse where we were staying and we had to go back the next day to pick up our backpacks. So instead of trying to explain to this man, who could barely speak English, that he was indeed useless and should at least learn the basics of each site so the clients would be happy with his knowledge, we took a deep breath. Hoping the Camel Safari would at least make up for it.

things to see on a tour rajasthan Not impressed with our “Sightseeing Tour”

Riding a Camel in the Thar Desert

The night before our host sat with us and talked through about the Thar Desert. He said: “Please bear in mind 3 things: Thar Desert is not the Sahara Desert; it’s not isolated as you will see villages, animals and people; and it’s not all Sand Dunes”. I guess that gave us a hint: Do not compare it to Sahara Desert and it’s India, even in the Desert we will find people wandering around!
That surely didn’t matter or made us concerned, we were thrilled to be spending a night in the Desert, riding a camel and be the closest we will ever be (most probably) to Pakistan.

jaisalmer tourArriving at the Desert just before meeting our Camel Safari Guide, Salim.

Real Desert Man Camel Safari Jaisalmer

Salim, our Camel Safari Guide, was already packing up and getting the camels when we arrived. I had ridden a horse before when I was 7-8 years old, my brother used to ride quite a lot before, so I was not so nervous on coming face-to-face with Camels. Thomas, not so much. I could see he was very stiff, and once I told him that animals could smell our fear, he relaxed.

We had only male camels, amongst the three of us. Apparently, females are not suitable for riding, and during the mating season the males become quite aggressive. Interesting, right? I asked Salim: “So when is the mating season?”, Salim replied: “Now. You will see them trying to bite each other, because they are a little desperate”. We laughed nervously. The last thing we wanted was to fall from the camels and hurt ourselves! Luckily everything went well.

jaisalmer camel safariSalim and his three Camels: Johnny, Rock & Raj

Our Camel Safari in pictures:

desert man camel safariSalim is a Real Desert Man

the real desert manOur first meal and a special guest, Mister Goat! 

rajasthan camel safari tourCamels are HUGE!

couple private tour camel safariDesert Selfie!

best camel safari indiaThat time I stopped riding the camel because the pain was unbearable!

camel safari indiaStopping for dinner. Erm… Telma a little obsessed with that particular Camel hahaha

spending the night camel safariSalim preparing our dinner

Best Camel Safari in Jaisalmer

When looking out for a Camel Safari Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, people should consider these:

  • Don’t book the camel safari online, once in Jaisalmer ask the hostel where you are staying. If still not sure, approach tourists in town. Nothing better than word of mouth from fellow travellers.
  • We would strongly recommend people to go on a private tour, although it is a little pricier than a group tour, but you know the camels are well treated and fed. Also, you will get all the time for yourself with the camels and the guide. Salim, our Guide was a real desert man, it was incredible chatting to him for hours about his life in the desert and getting to know a little more about camels.
  • Best tours are the one where the guide cooks all your meals over an open fire. Always choose the vegetarian option and make sure the food is cooked from scratch with fresh ingredients and vegetables. Water bottles must be unlimited.
  • More likely, if you chose a private tour, the guide will provide plenty of blankets and a mattress. Appreciate the small things in life, this is no luxury. For us, it was all about the experience.
  • It’s more fun having a camel to yourself. Sharing not only is boring, but also because it more weight for the camel to carry.

watching sunset jaisalmerSunset in the Thar Desert, Rajasthan

Camel Safari Travel Tips

Price – Don’t pay more than Rs2000 for a Guided Tour and Rs4000 for a Private Tour
Be adventurous – Stay for the night, without a tent
Pack light – All you need to bring is a warm jacket and socks (we took the thermal top & bottoms we wore when trekking to Everest Base Camp), headlamp, baby wipes, toothpaste and toothbrush, power bank, spare batteries.
Don’t forget the desert sun is HOT – bring a hat/scarf to protect you from the sun and apply sunscreen often.
Master those photographic skills – We really wished we had a better camera or perhaps a better knowledge of photography. Sleeping in the desert without a tent, looking at the sky, the moon moving through the night, witnessing the night, the sunrise and the early dawn was such a magical moment.




Jaisalmer Accommodation

There are so many rooms available in Jaisalmer that sometimes is hard to make a decision. We strongly recommend the hostel we stayed at. The hosts are lovely and surely gave us an unforgettable, yet unique experience. Make sure you ask for Salim as the Camel Safari Guide. Our Camel Safari Jaisalmer was without doubt the highlight of our time in India.

When booking your room, before making the payment, there is a “coupon” tab (highlighted in green, above the total charge), use our discount code and get $25/£30 off your own booking. Our room was booked through Airbnb and the hostel can be found here.

With Thanks to India Someday for the sponsored train journeys during our time in Rajasthan.

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We are Thomas and Telma – the writers, photographers, videographers and founders of Blank Canvas Voyage.

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Trekking to Everest Base Camp Independently

By Telma | 5 December 2016 | Nepal | Adventure Travel

There’s no doubt that everyone knows Mount Everest and that is the reason why trekking to Everest Base Camp became so well-known. Being able to say that we have been to the base of the highest mountain in the world is something that not many people can claim and that was what trigged us, the challenge, only dreamt by many. But is trekking to Everest Base Camp independently even possible?
And the answer is simple – Yes! No Guides, no Porters, only us. – And thousands of other people that have done the same.

As we planned and re-planned our itinerary and had this ideal vision on how superb our trek was going to be, things changed – we changed. The truth is, the itinerary below isn’t the original one. I struggled. I am not going to deny. Ironically during our travels, Thomas, who is the one that is often ill, during the trek he became Superhuman and I was the one struggling to get my act together. On our second day, upon reaching Namche, and facing the challenges on how tough it actually is, I realised that I had underestimated my capabilities but I wasn’t uncomfortable about it. I had to accept it in order to carry on. Many times, I thought “Why am I doing this?”. It was hard and physically challenging. This trek hit me and hit me hard. I kept reminding myself that was not in a race and it was up to us to decide our own pace. As the itinerary changed, having a flexible schedule and able to add extra rest days was very sensible and helped us to get through the tough challenge.

Obviously, I am proud I did it and managed it without a Porter to carry my bags but now looking back and knowing how my body reacted and how miserable I was during the day, I still pinch myself on how I survived those 17 days! Looking back, my advice to everyone would be to spend the extra money on a Porter, if you really want that support; carrying heavy bags where the air is thin and limited oxygen is an extra challenge that can be avoided. But as I hate petty complains and I am not the “moaning type of person”, I tried to balance the positives and negatives of the journey. Against all odds, we made it to Everest Base Camp! It took longer than planned, but we are so proud of our achievement. It was never about “how quickly can we make it” but “how amazing is that we DID it!”.

Anyone can trek to Everest Base Camp who wants a challenge. You really do find out what you are made of in this adventure!

trekking to everest base camp



A Journey to Everest Base Camp

Day 1 – Lukla to Phakding

Distance: 6.2 km/3.8 mi
Time: 5 hours
Elevation: 2610mt/9383ft

Once in Lukla Airport, at around 10am, we picked up our backpacks and grabbed breakfast at the European Bakery & Café. We were both fighting some “gastro issues” and the start of the trek was delayed because of the toilet runs! And this was only the first day! The plan was to go straight to Monju on the first night because it’s at a higher altitude and better for acclimatisation but by the time we arrived in Phakding it was 4pm. We were both exhausted and very hungry. After finishing eating it was too late to carry on.

The Journey: Although Lukla is located at 2800mt/9186ft on the first day we descended nearly 200 meters until we reached Phakding. Along the way we walked through beautiful scenery and had an easy walk with the river by the left side. We crossed our first suspension bridges, passed the first yaks and encountered several little cute villages.

Accommodation: Green Village Guesthouse, Cost: Rs200/USD$2/GBP£1.50 per night. Basic rooms and a very cold dining area. Glad we had sleeping bags as the blankets provided were very thin.

everest base camp plan

mani wall sherpa community

Day 2 – Phakding to Namche

Distance: 7.4 km/4.5 mi
Time: 8 hours
Elevation: 3,440 mt/11,286 ft

During the evening of Day 1 my phone stopped working, it literally died on me. I couldn’t get it back on and we had no option but to ask the owner of the teahouse to wake us up the following day. But he forgot! So again we had a very late start and left Phakding at 9.30am. We arrived at Monju by 1pm and stopped for lunch at Monju Guesthouse, owned by a Deaf Sherpa. Pemba and his wife kindly offered us lunch and tea. Thomas and Pemba chatted away but soon we had to hit the road, there was still a long way to Namche, at least for us! Phakding to Namche took us 4 hours. Before Namche there is a check-point (they check your TIMS Card and flight dates) and we nearly missed the “opening hours” as we arrived at 5.30pm. When we finally arrived at Namche village it was 6pm; pitch black. We couldn’t believe our luck… just on time. Our backpacks were heavy; despite the fact we had reduced the clothes and gear, hours before leaving Kathmandu. On our way to Namche, reality kicked in and we soon realised that the trekking to Everest Base Camp was going to be tougher than expected. We were disappointed with our pace, but we just couldn’t walk any faster. I am not going to lie, I was struggling.
On the way, we would see people walking freely, and next to them, their Porters. No wonder they walked so fast. At that stage we started thinking if the saving of $150 on a Porter had been a wise or a very dumb idea.

The Journey: Along the way we walked past several Sherpa villages, witnessed the hard life of the Porters, all of them carry heavy loads on their backs, crossed more suspensions bridges and faced our first big challenge of the journey; going uphill and ascending nearly 630 meters of elevation before arriving at Namche.
Tip: From Monju to Namche, after the first suspension bridge there is no water on the way. Glad we both drunk 1 litre each from one of the streams and filled our bottles for the trek. It’s a long and tiring walk.

Accommodation: Khumbu Lodge, Cost: Rs300/USD$3/GBP£2.50 per night. Amazing hospitality, very warm dining area and the food is very yummy. The lodge is well-known and preferred amongst trekking groups. The founder of the lodge, Pasang Kami Sherpa was reputable and well-known in the Sherpa Community. Khumbu Lodge is the oldest family run hotel in Namche.

trekking to everest base camp itinerary

how to trek to everest base camp independently

Day 3 – Rest day at Namche

Once at Namche we agreed that our original itinerary was no longer feasible. The trek to Namche, apparently, was the easiest and the worst was yet to come. But we were already exhausted on day 3, and the “killer hills” were coming our way. There was no way we could reach Base Camp on day 8, our bodies could not make it that fast. And it’s fine, we accepted it and took it slow, enjoyed more and started adding extra “rest days” along the way when needed. People usually stay in Namche for two nights, we opted to stay three and it was a great decision! We spent our day resting, drinking tea, washing some of our clothes and trying to figure out how could we reduce the weight of our backpacks once more. Our bodies were aching and we both had a light headache so the rest day was well deserved!
Tip: Every day at the Irish Pub and Liquid Bar there are Documentaries about Everest being shown. It’s a great way to spend an afternoon. The internet connections here are good, both from the wifi and SIM Card.

Accommodation: Khumbu Lodge, Cost: Rs300/USD$3/GBP£2.50 per night. Next to Khumbu Lodge is the Himalayan Café, where we stayed for hours enjoying the warmth, charging our electronics for FREE and eating their famous walnut brownie.

acclimatisation day everest base camp

planning to trek to everest base camp

Day 4 – Acclimatisation day at Namche

Elevation: 3,880 mt/12,730 ft

Today was Acclimatisation Day at Namche. We walked to the Sherpa Museum and to the Everest View Hotel at 3,880 mt/12,730 ft and had our first glimpse of Mount Everest! It was surreal. Everest was there…in front of us. The views of the Himalayan Range are superb: Ama Dablam, Lhotse, Nuptse and many others. The walk was “easy”, considering that we were not carrying our backpacks. We opted for a different route on the way back, so we had time to visit Namche Monastery and one of the longest Mani Walls in the world. On the way up, was like leaving Namche behind, on the way down was like facing Namche as we were arriving. It was a big loop and from start to finish took us around 5 hours. At the Khumbu Lodge we met Tommy, a Swedish man that lives in Namche for 6 months, the rest of the year he travels around the world. On that day we asked him to use his laptop, as my phone was no longer working. At night, I tried to resuscitate my phone…and it worked! Maybe it was the rest and acclimatisation day!!

Accommodation: Khumbu Lodge, Cost: Rs300/USD$3/GBP£2.50 per night. At the Himalayan Café we met three climbers, they were on their way to climb Ama Dablam. An American guy called Jo and an Italian couple, Guido and Marina. We spent the afternoon chatting away with them, not only they were super cool but also had tons of great advice for us.

travel blog about trekking to everest base camp

the view of namche bazaar

Day 5 – Namche to Tengboche

Distance: 5.9 km/3.6 mi
Time: 7 hours
Elevation: 3,860 mt/12,665 ft

On Day 4 we sorted out our backpacks and managed to reduce the weight, leaving unused clothes and unnecessary gear behind at the Khumbu Lodge, free of charge. We left Namche at 8.30am, stopped at Phunki Thenga for lunch and trekked an extra 2.5 hours to Tengboche. The weather once again was great and at 3.30pm we had superb views of Everest. Once settled, we visited Tengboche Monastery, which is the largest in the Khumbu Region. Sir Edmund Hillary and Tensing Norway were blessed at this monastery before their summit trek on Everest.

That night, after dinner I started to count the money and realised that the money left was only enough to trek to Gorak Shep, leaving us without money on the way back down to Lukla. Not wanting to panic, I did! And there wasn’t much we could do, no ATM’s and we couldn’t use our credit cards. That was the worst night during the trek, I woke up at 2 am and started crying because we had no money and there were only two options left: Carry on hungry or turn back.
“How could have we budget it so wrong that we would run out of money half way?” – that was the question that gave me a sleepless night. The dream of reaching Everest Base Camp soon started fading away. There was no way we could carry on without eating as much, trekking in the Everest Region is tiring and people must and should eat as much as they can. This was not the place to start skimping.

The Journey: Leaving Namche was challenging; the uphill is a killer. The next 2 hours were fine and ascending slowly. After lunch, the ascending to Tengboche is endless, we were happy once we arrived at the top! Along the way we stopped several times, not only because we were very tired but because the views are breathtaking. The walk through the Dudh Kosi River Valley and the mountain views nearly had us forgetting how difficult the trek was becoming.

Accommodation: Gomba Lodge, Cost: Free, but we had to eat all our meals there. Out of all the teahouses we stayed, without sounding horrible, this was the worst accommodation on the trek. The rooms and the dining were extremely cold, beyond freezing! That night we met Pascal and Angelika, two German friends with plans to trek to Everest Base Camp and the infamous Cho La Pass, exactly what we wanted to do. But we unfortunately had to drop out upon reaching Namche.

trek to everest base camp itinerary

how to plan to trek to everest base camp

Day 6 – Tengboche

In the morning, I broke the news to Thomas and we both sat in silence for a while. At 7am, before breakfast we had to decide whether to carry on or go back. As expected Thomas was speechless but we had to figure out what we could and couldn’t eat for the next few days, to the point we no longer could afford to drink tea. This was bad, I couldn’t believe that we were going through this. As I switched my phone back on and logged onto Facebook, Linnea (a Swedish girl that we had met during our stay at Kantipur Hotel in Kathmandu), had just commented on our picture, taken at Namche. She was making her way to Tengboche later that day. BINGO! Perhaps she could lend us some money…like Rs20,000!! Without her, we would have had no option but to turn back.

We are, obviously, forever grateful for her generosity and willingness to help us out! She was part of a group, where her friends were part of, so she had the spare money. Not to mention that I was glad the internet connection was still working….very slow but enough to send texts. We made the most of the day by trekking two hours uphill for the most magnificent views of Tengboche and we could see Namche to our left. Now that was high and great for acclimatisation at 4000 mt/ 13,125 ft.

Accommodation: Gomba Lodge, Cost: Free, same as day 5.

everest base camp altitude sickness tips

the views everest base camp trek

Day 7 – Tengboche to Dingboche

Distance: 9.1 km/ 5.6 mi
Time: 7 hours
Elevation: 4,410 mt/14,470 ft

Left Tengboche at 8am, just after breakfast. One hour into the trek after the bridge there is a very narrow path uphill. We couldn’t quite figure out how to walk through it. While stopped and looking at the map, a group of Guides passed by and told us to take the longer route, on the opposite direction, because the night before a man had fallen to his death into the river by trying to walk in the narrow path walked only by the Porters. The option to save 10-15 minutes had cost his life. It’s a scary thought, just what looks like a simple and wise decision can be a fatal one. Porters know the terrain and have been walking it for years, but the independent trekkers who don’t know, need to think twice while walking through the valley. On that day we “learnt” and decided that we were no longer to follow the path Porters walk through.
We stopped at Shomare for lunch and after carried on trekking for a further 3 hours, reaching Dingboche around 3.30pm.
That night we both felt very hungry. Our appetites started to grow the further we went up the trek and we had two dinners each, at 6pm and at 8pm we order food again. It was no longer possible to stick to 3 meals a day. From Dingboche onwards the only way to access the internet is buying Data cards, enough for sending a few emails.

The Journey: The walk through the valley is as beautiful as it is scary. The narrow edges make you very weary where to walk and one foot wrong and you are gone down the hill! During the trek the views of the Himalayan Range are beautiful as ever. Ama Dablam, at 6812 meters, lies just above the village, giving people great photography opportunities.

Accommodation: SnowLion Cost: Free, but we had to eat all our meals there. The family’s hospitability is outstanding. Very warm dining room and very spacious. The food is great too.
Next to the lodge there is a bakery, with freshly baked cheesecake, apple pie, brownies, etc. With all the offer, you nearly forget how cold it is at this stage!

villages in everest base camp trek

mountains in everest base camp

Day 8 – Acclimatisation day in Dingboche

Elevation: 4,410 mt/14,470 ft

Woke up at 8am. Had a relaxed morning and washed some clothes. The weather remained beautiful and we were welcomed every day with blue and clear skies! Climbed an extra 200 meters for acclimatisation and had great views of Dingboche, Ama Dablam, Lhotse and Nuptse. Spent the afternoon at the bakery eating cakes, drinking tea and chatting to Pascal and Angelika, whom had made it to Dingboche as well.
That night we both had a headache. Thomas felt better but mine wouldn’t go away. We took paracetamol before going to bed.

Accommodation: SnowLion Cost: Free. Same as day 7.

when is the best time to trek everest base camp







Day 9 – Dingboche to Lobuche

Distance: 6.6 km/4.1 mi
Time: 7 hours
Elevation: 4,940 meters / 16,207 feet

Left Dingboche at 8.30 am. The first climb is a little challenging and now due to the altitude our backpacks felt twice as heavy. I was walking very slow and kept stopping constantly. Glad the weather was great and the views were just breathtaking. It took us 2 hours to arrive in Dughla. At this stage I was focused on putting one foot in front of the other as my mood started to change. During the trek, I did ask Thomas not to talk to me so we could both focus on the walk and I could keep it to myself: the frustration of wanting to go faster but my body wouldn’t let me.
We had plans of staying in Dughla for the night but upon reaching it for lunch we both felt reasonably good and pressed on to Lobuche. During lunch, looking up we could see what was coming our way – Dughla Pass. It was no joke and we had to tackle the beast. It took us 1 hour and 45 minutes to reach the top, on the way up we probably stopped 20 times, my body was fighting with my head, so I was just taking it slow and walk at my own pace. I know Thomas often felt frustrated but the last thing I wanted was to argue especially under those circumstances. I would catch him up when I could or he would be waiting for me.
During the evening I had a very bad headache, so after dinner we decided to stay one extra night, in order for our bodies to acclimatize better.

The Journey: Leaving Dingboche was extremely difficult and we did take our time during the climb. Dughla Pass is a “monster” and we were relieved to have reached the top without any Altitude Sickness symptoms. Once at the top, we visited several memorials from famous climbers and Sherpas who have perished while summiting Mount Everest. The memorial for American climber Scott Fischer, who died descending from Everest in 1996, can also be found here. It’s hard to explain the scenery on the way to Lobuche, but it looks like “a journey through middle-earth” out of Lord of the Rings film set. The mountains, walking though boulders, steep ascending, the valley and the no-where! It felt surreal, that we were there at 4,940 meters / 16,207 feet of altitude!

Accommodation: Sherpa Lodge, Cost: Rs200/USD$2/GBP£1.50. The facilities and food were nothing special, the toilets are far from the rooms, and waking up in the middle of the night when it’s 10 to go to the toilet is no fun. I wouldn’t recommend this place, there are other options, although this is one of the cheaper accommodations in the village.

tips for everest base camp trek

trekking passes in everest

Day 10 – Lobuche

In the morning, the headache has disappeared and during breakfast after hearing the horror stories that four people had to be rescued at Gorak Sheep for not acclimatising and walking too fast, we soon began to think that we were actually extremely lucky to have the extra days and a flexible schedule. And after all, glad we were trekking to Everest Base Camp independently, no Guides and no groups adding stress or pressure on us. At this stage we were becoming a little fed up. The original plan was to reach Everest Base Camp on day 8, and it was now day 10. But our health was our priority, obviously.
Opting for a relaxed day, we spent the afternoon at the bakery watching movies. There was no need for walking or ascending, staying at Lobuche was enough for our bodies to acclimatize at higher altitude.

Accommodation: Sherpa Lodge, Cost: Rs200/USD$2/GBP£1.50. Same as day 9.

trekking in nepal travel blog

Day 11 – Lobuche to Gorak Shep – Kala Patthar

Distance: 11.5 km/ 7.2 mi
Time: 5 hours
Elevation: 5,545 mt/ 18.190 ft

Left Lobuche at 6.30am and it was -10 degrees. Without doubt the journey to Gorak Shep was the hardest day on the trek, a real endurance test to our bodies. Although, walking through boulders and the glacier was phenomenal and the scenery was astonishing! We had planned to go to Everest Base Camp after lunch at Gorak Shep, which meant we would go to Kala Patthar the next for the sunrise. But after talking to some people we changed the plan and went to Kala Patthar for sunset instead. And we were not disappointed!
The climb took 3 hours, some people do it in less than 2 hours, but we again just took it slow. The views of the Himalayas and Everest are enough to leave you speechless! On the way to the top, we took pictures, filmed and embraced ourselves in the moment, a one-off opportunity.
Tip: The strong/freezing winds at the top are enough to knock someone out, both literally and physically. I had a very bad cold and temperature during that night. The altitude hit us both hard during the climb, was no laughing matter. It’s real. The best way at this stage, all your movements are slow.
If you can, choose the sunset over the sunrise. First, the wakeup call it’s at 4am and secondly, the morning sun is blinding, and it’s nearly impossible to take good pictures.

The Journey: The trek follows along the moraine of the famous Khumbu Glacier all the way to Gorak Shep, a village in the middle of no-where. And Everest never looked so close!
The climb to Kala Patthar will put anyone to the test, at 5,545 mt/ 18.190 ft no one can expect an easy walk! The views at the top? Beyond words! INCREDIBLE! At the top we were rewarded with of the most epic views at all times, Lhotse, Nuptse and of course the Almighty Mount Everest just in front of us! And It’s the closest we will ever get. Looking at the right, far away Ama Dablam looked now so “small”!

Accommodation: SnowLand Cost: Rs300/USD$3/GBP£2.50. The food isn’t that bad but what can you expect at higher altitude? The rooms, the toilets and the service from the staff was mediocre. Also, there are no taps, so washing hands is out of the equation. The drinking water is grey/muddy and we were thrilled to have our filtered bottles, everyone else was just drinking dirty water.

the view from kala patthar

best time to climb kala patthar

Day 12 – Gorak Shep to Everest Base Camp

Time: 5 hours (return)
Elevation: 5,364 mt / 17,598 ft

Before breakfast we both had a horrible headache and started having double-vision. It was so scary that we both drunk 1.5 liters of water each and sat by the dining area for a good 2 hours. Later in the morning we decided that going to base camp and after making our way down to Lobuche was too much, so we stayed at Gorak Shep an extra night. I wasn’t looking forward to an extra night in all honesty but seeing the circumstances, there wasn’t much choice.
And after 12 days of trekking we finally reached Everest Base Camp! The round trip took us 5 hours, once we were there at base camp we stayed for an hour. Appreciating the views, the Khumbu Glacier and pinching ourselves for making it this far! What a dream come true!
I had envisaged jumping and posing with my Portuguese flag, taking lots of pictures…but I could barely walk that day, let alone trying to be creative for pictures.
Tip: During our trek we met several people that bragged about Kala Patthar and advised us, if running out of time, we should choose Kala Patthar over Everest Base Camp. And we are so glad we didn’t have to make any decisions and made it to both! It’s IMPOSSIBLE to choose because both offer different feelings. The views are superb and if like us, anyone chooses to go trekking in November when the weather is just crystal clear, the trek to EBC will not disappoint.

The Journey: Simply breathtaking! We were literally dwarfed by the enormous Himalayas Range and the Khumbu Glacier. Words are not enough to describe both the feeling and the scenery, so we leave a few pictures.

Accommodation: SnowLand Cost: Rs300/USD$3/GBP£2.50. Same as day 11.

everest base camp guide and itinerary

what everest base camp looks like

travel blog couple trek to everest base camp

Mission accomplished: Kala Patthar and Everest Base Camp was now ticked off on our bucket lists!
And regardless the struggles, up’s and downs of the long trek, we were so proud of ourselves. Yes, it did take us longer than expected but that is not important. People congratulated us for the achievement, and no one cares, neither do we, if it took 12 days.
But the trek was not finished! Now was time to start walking back down.

Day 13

Left Gorak Shep at 8.30am and reached Periche at 4pm. It was the easiest and most pleasant walk on the trek, because it was always downhill! At Lobuche we stopped for lunch and saw a girl being airlifted by the rescue helicopter, she couldn’t even walk due to the altitude sickness. It was a horrible scene to witness.
Accommodation: SnowLand, cost Rs100/USD$1/GBP£0.80 per night. The best blankets and the cosiest rooms on the trek.

Day 14 & 15

Set the challenge to walk from Periche to Namche, are we crazy or what? Online and from the people that we spoke with, the trek should last 4-5 hours, but ours took nearly 10? What went wrong? And the only answer I have is, exhaustion. I was no longer walking; I was literally dragging my body through. I had zero energy left and if I could and had the money I would have paid a helicopter to take me down all the way to Lukla!

Tough…I still had to walk for the next few days. And guess what? We reached Namche at night time – pitch black…exactly like day 2. I wish there was a camera filming the way we walked through the reception, it must have looked like two ghosts. Our bodies were aching. For dinner, we ordered pizza, french fries, momos, a small pot of tea and banana pancake for desert. Went to bed at 8pm.

We decided to take advantage of the yummy food, the big bed with an electric blanket and the hot shower at the lodge and stayed an extra day.

Accommodation: Khumbu Lodge, cost: Rs2000/USD$20/GBP£15. Yes, we treated ourselves to a bigger, warmer room with a private toilet/shower and power sockets. The budget was already blown out of proportion because we were so hungry all the time, and kept adding meals throughout the day, so splurging on a better room with hot shower was, at the time, the best decision ever.
We had our first shower in 14 days.

Day 16 & 17

As we had two extra days to spare until our flight from Lukla to Kathmandu, we opted to stay at Monju with Pemba and his wife. Accommodation: Monju Guesthouse. While Thomas and Pemba chatted away, I spent my day resting and drinking tea.

Day 17, after lunch we walked to Lukla. Accommodation: Himalaya Lodge, cost: Rs200/USD$2/GBP£1.50.
YES… We were back in Lukla! I swear I was teary on the return day, it all got a bit emotional. But we were both really looking forward to go back to Kathmandu. This was a hell of an adventure, out of our comfort zone, more than anything we could have ever had imagined in our wildest dreams.







General Information About Trekking to Everest Base Camp

Accommodation – From Lukla to Namche there are plenty of options. It’s quite overwhelming during the trek, because there are so many. The higher it gets the options are limited. We went peak season and never had problems on finding a room for the night and never booked anything in advance.
Average Prices: Rs100-Rs300/USD$1-3/GBP£0.80-2.50 per night (basic accommodation – no bedside table, power sockets. It’s literally just a bed, bed sheets and a blanket!)

Food – It’s quite amazing to see the variety of food on offer along the trail, even at 5,164 m /16,942 ft we could get noodles, pasta, pizza, burgers, curries, stews, pancakes, cakes and the list goes on. The higher we went the prices increased, and the quality of the food decreased! Or perhaps at higher altitude everyone’s taste buds aren’t as accurate. Some people suffer loss of appetite and struggle to eat but we were just the opposite and couldn’t stop eating. After Tengboche we started eating a lot more at each meal, which was a big dent on our budget.
Average Food Prices:
From Lukla to Namche – Rs300-Rs400/USD$3-4/GBP£2.50-3.50 per meal
From Namche to Gorak Shep – Rs500-Rs700/USD$7/GBP£5 per meal
Note: There is no differentiation between meals, breakfast costs the same as lunch/dinner and desert.

Wifi & Charging electronics – Back in Kathmandu and because we stayed in Nepal for nearly three months we had bought a SIM card, so accessing the internet during the trek was not an issue. The bakeries at Namche “offer” free wifi but a cup of tea costs rs200 and a slice of cake costs Rs500. Expect a very slow connection. Wifi data cards are sold through the trail, the ones we saw were Rs500 for 200mb and Rs1000 for 500mb. To charge electronics, phones, cameras, power banks, the average costs are Rs250-Rs400, per hour. The higher in altitude the more expensive it gets.
Average Prices: Rs250-Rs400/USD$2.50-4.50/GBP£1.50-3.50 per night

Money & Budget – This is where we failed miserably and had to borrow money from a friend that, luckily, was also doing the trek at the same time. Thank you, Linnea 🙂
In this section, some people will disagree with us and argue that it can be done much cheaper. It’s true.
But we started to add extra meals and days, and drinking a lot of tea, so our budget blew out of proportion. Our friend, Monica ate twice a day and was fine with it. We were just too hungry and refused to skimp on food. Also for this section, we strongly recommend to budget way above just in case.
Average daily average costs for one person:
The minimum

Food: Rs500 per meal x 3 meals = Rs1500/USD$15/GBP£10
Accommodation: Rs200/USD$2/GBP£1.50
The extras
Tea/cakes: Rs300/USD$3/GBP£2.50
Charging electronics: Rs250-Rs500/USD$5/GBP£3
Hot showers: Rs400-Rs500/USD$5/GBP£3
Water bottles: Rs100-Rs350/USD$3.50/GBP£2.50

The last chance to withdraw money from a ATM is at Namche, but some lodges all the way to Gorak Shep accept card payments, and add 10% service charge.

Acclimatisation Days (Altitude Sickness, Health Issues & Water)

Dealing with Altitude Sickness & Health Issues
Altitude Sickness or Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is the major concern when trekking at high altitudes and most trekkers get an upset stomach. AMS can strike if elevation is gained too rapidly and without proper acclimatisation. Suggestions for acclimatising smoothly are: Keeping warm, eating well, drinking plenty of water, getting enough sleep/resting, and avoiding alcohol. All of these will reduce the chances of developing AMS.
The golden rule is don’t go too high to fast and high hike, sleep low.
Our bodies had plenty of time to acclimatize due to how slow we walked throughout the trek and that explains why we barely suffered from it. We had light headaches and it wasn’t until Gorak Shep that we had some symptoms. But we did pretty well, drunk a lot of water every day and managed the whole time without taking Diamox. Taking Ibrobufen also helped the headaches

Water – There are many water streams on the way, especially from Lukla to Lobuche. But as we went higher up the water became scarce. Our routine was to drink 4-5 litres of water every day. The first few days we drunk 2-3 litres, but once at Namche we increased our intake up to 5 litres.
Although we both normally drink a lot of water during the day, forcing ourselves to drink up to 5 litres was hard, because it became monotonous and the toilet breaks became annoying during the day. Drinking bottled water is always the safest, but as you are trekking in remote areas and buying water can get expensive for a litre, so we carried a LifeStraw.

Tips and Suggestions before trekking to Everest Base Camp

Don’t underestimate the sun at higher altitude, it burns badly. Wear SPF 30+ factor every day.
Warm thermal layers, a fleece, a warm cap and good sturdy boots are a must amongst all the clothing that you bring for the trek.
Don’t skip the acclimatisation days, because it can have serious repercussions. Not only you are not giving your body enough time to adapt to higher altitude but also because you will end up missing out on the lookout for the best views of the Himalayas.
Trekking to EBC independently is great but at times, I thought “why didn’t we hire a Porter?” – So on that my advice is: If you are “reasonable fit and CAN carry a backpack for 7-8 hours a day through steep ascends, you don’t need a Porter. But, if like me, you have ZERO fitness levels maybe you should consider hiring one. I am still proud we didn’t though!
Eat well, skipping meals is not a good option because the body burns a lot of calories during the trek. Also, being hungry will not help if you suffer from altitude sickness.
Bring more money that you think you will need. We budgeted very badly and nearly had to turn back. Food prices soars the higher you get and your appetite might increase as well.
Buy a LifeStraw, not only it will last for over 6 months, just in case you are travelling for a while but the water you drink is 99.99% clean. The water at Lobuche and Gorak Shep was grey and muddy, we were glad we had our filters.
Have a flexible schedule and extra days to spare on the itinerary. You never know when Altitude Sickness strikes, or maybe you just want to relax one extra day.
If trekking during the colder months, November-December, you must bring a -20 sleeping bag and a -20 down jacket. Those can be hired in Thamel, Kathmandu. It’s freezing during the evenings/early mornings, every day we thanked ourselves for having those items. We saw many people struggling with the freezing temperatures.

Read our articles Everest Base Camp related:
Preparation for Everest Base Camp
Packing List: What to Pack for Everest Base Camp
How Much Does Trekking to Everest Base Camp Cost

There you go…all you need to know about trekking to Everest Base Camp Independently!

After starting the descent and walking back the only thing that went through our minds was “We made it!”. As the days passed by, the struggles were now a distant memory. Besides the long and tiring days, we loved every moment of it. From the infamous flight to Lukla, the intimidating days and only one route leading to the base of the highest mountain in the world, all made this trip an unforgettable experience.

It is a formidable journey, the long days, the aching, the thin air, carrying a backpack, the forcing yourself to get hydrated and drink 5-6 litres of water a day…it’s not easy. Alarming and actually scary at times. I believe, it’s actually a massive challenge for anyone and if to be contemplated seriously before committing. But those days spent in the Himalayas, the remote locations, the breathtaking scenery, standing at 5,545 mt/ 18.190 ft of altitude, walking on Everest Base Camp, looking at Khumbu Glacier and facing Mount Everest…was more than a dream come true, was adrenaline and excitement, a moment that we both will cherish forever. It is certainly a trip where you discover your character and grow in spirit through the personal challenges that you are confronted by every day.

During our flight, back to Kathmandu while I was looking at the window plane and saying my goodbyes to the Himalayas, Thomas tapped me on the shoulder and signed: “I want to climb Kilimanjaro”!………!!

blog everest base camp

Special Thanks:

We would like to thank Linnea for lending us money, so we could finish our trek! Monica Keller for all the tips, information and advice regarding Everest Base Camp. And last but not least, to our new friends Pascal and Angelika, whom we met during the trek: to our many nights chatting away!

Further reading: Lonely Planet Trekking in the Nepal Himalaya (Travel Guide) is a complete and all-inclusive guide for those wanting to experience and explore Trekking in the Himalaya. We strongly recommend reading this guide as it helped us planning our own trip.

Happy Travels!

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guide about itinerary accommodation and food to everest base camp

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Hiking Mount Yasur – Vanuatu

By Telma and Thomas | 10 June 2016 | Vanuatu | Adventure Travel

For centuries, Mount Yasur has been one of the most active volcanos in the world, and Vanuatu’s most accessible one. She is the reason tourists visit Tanna and, let us tell you… she is beautiful!

From the moment we landed in Tanna we couldn’t stop thinking about Mt Yasur. We had watched videos on YouTube, read blogs about it, so something spectacular was coming our way.
There was no need to book in advance or make any reservations, we just informed our host that we wanted to visit the volcano and he made all the necessary arrangements.

Staying at Imaio Village had a massive advantage because it’s only a 30-40 minutes’ walk to the volcano, which was pretty easy and affordable, as it saved us a lot of money on transportation. Our host allocated two guides, so we wouldn’t get lost. Believe us, it’s a real jungle out there through a dense forest, and there’s no one to be seen.

Once at the entrance, we paid 15,000vt/USD$140/GBP£110 (two people) and our guides stayed outside waiting for us. We joined more tourists and in the price is included a Dance Show, Transportation to the Volcano, Tour Guides and complimentary drinks/fruit at the end of the tour.
We chose to go in the afternoon so we could stay at the volcano during the evening, as the lava explosions are more visible in the dark. From the dance show until the coming back to the entrance it lasted approximately four hours.

It’s an amazing experience and even though it wasn’t cheap at all, it was worth it because there aren’t many accessible ACTIVE volcanos in the world. So we had to do it!
The show is breathtaking! We stayed into the night and were overwhelmed by her power and beauty.

Find out more about Mt Yasur here



Hiking Mount Yasur 

friend visit mount yasur

The surrounding area is quiet and peaceful, and from time to time you will hear the rumbling of Yasur in the background.

how mount yasur looks like

In the middle of the day, the eruptions aren’t as visual apparent. However, we can still see the blanket of volcanian ash covering Yasur’ slopes.

the only post box on an active volcano

There is a post box on Mt. Yasur and is recognised as the only post box in the world on a live volcano.

mount yasur explosion

It is really a once in a lifetime opportunity, you cannot miss it. The walk to the rim of this fiery volcano certainly makes a visit to Tanna unforgettable.

mount yasur at night

How many people can say they stood on the edge of an active volcano?







Mt Yasur Checklist

  • Jacket or a scarf
  • Lantern
  • Water
Go in the afternoon, so you can stay until evening. It’s beautiful.
Choose you accommodation around the volcano, so you can easily go for a walk.
Note: For people wondering if they can access the volcano without joining a tour, please be advised that it’s not possible for safety reasons. You must pay the ticket and you must follow the guide’s rules.

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Hiking The Tongariro Alpine Crossing

By Telma | 28 March 2016 | New Zealand | Adventure Travel

Hiking the famous Tongariro Crossing is not for the faint hearted! Period. It’s tough, demanding and will test anyone’s fitness and determination. If you have any doubts whether you can do it or not, we can reassure you that thousands of people are doing it everyday. All you need is a positive attitude, enough time and good hiking boots! So if you are preparing to hike the Tongariro Alpine Crossing you will be pleased to read our article where we show you the route, suggest useful tips and write about our own experience on New Zealand’s best day hike. Just go and you will not regret.

Tongariro Alpine Crossing is a World Heritage site that will take you through the raw volcanic terrain. The crossing passes of the multi-cratered active volcano Mount Tongariro and the option to climb Mount Ngauruhoe as a side trip. Which we chose not to climb because we didn’t have the time to do it.
The Crossing is one of the reasons people flock to the North Island with the aim of finishing one of the most demanding hikes of New Zealand.

What we were not aware of, is that this unique track is full of unexpected surprises. These paths take fierce ascents and descents into and back out of two different craters, passing Emerald Lakes and along the edge of the Blue Lake.

a day hike out tongariro alpine crossing



Preparing to Hike the Tongariro Alpine Crossing

tongariro alpine crossing checklist

The hike is brutal but worth it! This is something that we would like to do again, for sure. What people need to realise is that the hike is very demanding and if, like us you have a bus waiting at the end of the track, it’s more likely that you will be running in those last few miles. Why? Because you will lose track of time and by the end of it, you will most probably be late!

Tongariro Alpine Crossing Route – The total distance is 19.4 km /12.05 miles
Starting at Mangatepopo Hut and ending at Ketetahi Road, the route takes roughly seven – eight hours of walking. Since it starts and finishes at different ends, we had to arrange transportation for the drop-off and pick-up.

The trek will take you through some spectacular sites, so in a nutshell,  below are the highlights of the crossing:

  • Coloured Lava
  • Soda Springs
  • Devil‘ Staircase
  • Mt Ngauruhoe “Mt Doom“
  • South Crater
  • Red Crater (Half Way)
  • Emerald Lakes
  • Blue Lake
  • Long descent
  • Ketetahi hot springs

Distances (approximetly 19.4km)

Car Park to Soda Springs
= 4.4km
Soda Springs to South Crater
= 2.0 km
South Crater to Emerald Lakes
= 2.6 km
Emerald Lakes to Ketetahi Hut
= 4.0 km
Ketetahi Hut to Car Park
= 6.4km

Walking Times (6-8 hours)

Car Park to Soda Springs
= 1-1.5 hours
Soda Springs to South Crater
= 1 hour
South Crater to Emerald Lakes
= 1.5 hours
Emerald Lakes to Ketetahi Hut
= 1-2 hours
Ketetahi Hut to Car Park
= 1.5-2 hours

Altitudes (approximetely)

Mangatepopo = 1100m
South Crater = 1660m
Red Crater = 1900m
Emerald Lakes = 1700m
Central Crater = 1710m
Ketetahi = 700m

*Source from Roam

what do you see during tongariro hike

Hiking the Tongariro Alpine Crossing

Known as one of the most challenging hikes, how do two humble average backpackers who are keen to complete the track but have no experience, survive hiking this humongous alpine crossing? 
Exactly, I don’t know either.

The day before we checked in at Whakapapa Village, they allow leaving the car parked inside the grounds during the hike and before we knew it we had booked the shuttle for the following day.

Not really knowing what to expect apart from walking through mountains and volcanos, when we originally started planning the trek, we had both assumed it would be just a hike. How wrong we were!

starting point at the tongariro crossingAnd so it begins!

Soon after the journey had begun, we got an idea of what the weather, and views were likely to be.
Tongariro Crossing can be so hit and miss; one minute it’s hot, the next you are freezing cold but we were up for the jackpot as the skies were semi-clear and there was no wind at all.

From the car park to the beginning of the crossing takes up to half an hour so we chatted, took pictures and walked slowly. The following hour there was a slight incline until we arrived at Soda Springs.
 Little did we know what was coming next…

what tongariro crossing looks like

And then the first ascent came. 
From Soda Springs to the South Crater we were walking uphill, but it was so steep that NOW I understand why it’s called Devil’s Staircase. It’s a steep, sweaty climb ascending around 300m up the rough volcanic path. The stairs, made of wood built into the mountain side, were endless, and stretches between them were high and difficult to climb. From a distance, it looked rather easy but doing it was indeed hell.

We had to stop many times, we just couldn’t do it all in one hit.
The fact is our lungs gave in before our legs: Thomas is asthmatic and I just suck at any kind of exercise.
Let’s not talk about it…

our day hike in new zealand



The next stage of the trek is where you can actually choose to hike Mt Ngauruhoe (aka Mt Doom from Lord of the Rings) as a side trip.
Looking at it from down below, and reading that it would take an extra 2 hours, there was no way we wanted to tackle the beast, specially not yet having reached the Red Crater. The aim was to finish the crossing on that day, not the following week, so we passed on this one!

what mount doom looks like

Mount Ngauruhoe (Mount Doom represents the endpoint of Frodo quest to destroy the Ring which is recounted in The Lord of the Rings. Mt Doom was the volcano in Mordor where the Ring was forged and finally destroyed)

The trekking, that sometimes felt like “rock climbing”, was so steep that in some parts we had to pull ourselves up with a metal chain. Also “reaching the top” became an illusion, because there were so many false summits, that each time reaching the “top” was confronted by another 100 metres up. This was just endless!

But once we reached the top of the Red Crater we were so happy! It felt like the best achievement of our lives! The views at the top were just breathtaking. We were blown away by the 360 degrees’ panoramic view.

Also it was the perfect stop for lunch as we sat in silence just enjoying the moment, we could barely believe it; in front of us a gigantic red crater, to our right three green lakes glistening emerald colours…everywhere we looked there was something incredible to see.

new zealand volcano the red craterOn top of the red crater

And then was time to start the descent…which was no way easier than the ascent! Why couldn’t we just roll down the crater? Surely that would save us nearly two hours!
This part is so hard because you must find your balance, at the same time be careful not to twist your ankles and ultimately cursing yourself for not taking snowboard lessons seriously. That section was probably the most cruelling on the legs and it seemed just to go forever.
Once we “survived” that backdrop we reached the gorgeous Emerald Lakes.

how emerald lakes look like

hiking tongariro crossing and emerald lakesThe arduous walk for 4.5 hour paid off.

But don’t be fooled as you still have another 3-4 hours ahead of you.
From here we passed the Blue Lake and the route descends to Ketetahi Hut and the nearby springs down through native forest to the car park.

the end of tongariro alpine crossing

There is no doubt that it is a challenging walk if you are not used to hiking but as long as the weather is good, it’s do-able by most people.
The Tongariro Crossing was the highlight of our time in New Zealand and we were extremely lucky with the weather. We stopped many times because it was just so hard but overall it was an incredible experience. It took us 8hours and 15 minutes to complete the crossing.

The best time of the year to plan your trip is in the Spring or Autumn, we were there in March. During the winter months you must go with a tour guide and are requested to use crampons and during the summer it’s just incredibly crowed.

Tongariro Alpine Crossing Checklist

  • Bring water, minimum 2 litres
  • Pack a light lunch – nuts, dried fruits, etc
  • Bring tissues/ toilet paper
  • Pack “all weather clothes” – temperatures can change quite dramatically and even at short notice.
  • Waterproof case/cover, sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, gloves
  • Take some plasters and antiseptic cream
  • Bring spare batteries
  • If like us, you use the phone to take pictures, make sure you have a chargeable device with you. Your battery will just disappear in no time
  • Know your limits
  • Tell someone your plan
  • Last but not least, do check the weather conditions prior to the crossing. We understand that the last thing you want is to postpone the hike, but do not attempt to do it if there is severe bad weather. It is really not worth your life. Plus, your picture will look bad anyways… ☺

How much does Hiking the Tongariro Alpine Crossing Cost?

The hike itself will not cost you anything, although you must book either a drop off or a pick up, or both. We met a couple who chose to leave the car at the starting point (Mangatepopo Hut), walked all the way to the Red Crater and walked back to the car. This is something that we wouldn’t recommend though, because they missed the Emerald Lakes.

The day before we arrived at Whakapapa Village and booked two nights. We left the car in the car park and at 8am a bus picked us up from the village and dropped us at Mangatepopo Hut. Later in the afternoon, the same bus picked us up at the end (Ketetahi Road) and drove us back to the village.

Cost: NZ$70/USD$50/GBP£38 for two people

Further reading: Lonely Planet New Zealand’s North Island (Travel Guide) is a complete and all-inclusive guide for those wanting to experience and explore New Zealand North Island. We strongly recommend reading this guide as it helped us planning our own trip.

Happy Travels!

Did you find this article useful? Have you hiked the Tongariro Alpine Crossing?

the best of tongariro alpine crossing

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Thank-You for Readingfiji islands travel blog

We are Thomas and Telma – the writers, photographers, videographers and founders of Blank Canvas Voyage.

Let us inspire you to explore the world through the sharing of our experiences, stories, videos and useful tips. Click here to know more about our journey.